Nancy Bryant

Nancy Bryant, Costume Designer

Pacific Opera Victoria
Das Rheingold

October, 2014


Nancy made her POV debut as costume designer for Pacific Opera Victoria's original production of Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress in November 2009. She designed her first set, along with the costumes, for Handel's Rodelinda, followed in 2011 by the costume design for The Flying Dutchman. She returns in 2014 to design the costumes for Das Rheingold.

Nancy has designed for theatre and dance across Canada and internationally.

Costume designs for The Arts Club Theatre include Tear the Curtain, The Constant Wife, Cyrano, Waiting for Godot, Arsenic and Old Lace, Sweeney Todd, She Loves Me, Girl in a Goldfish Bowl, Irma Vep, Hamlet, The Visit, The Imaginary Invalid and Maniac Bride.

Costume designs for The Playhouse include Oliver, The Amorous Adventures of Anatol, Fiddler on the Roof and Hello Dolly. Other costume designs include Amadeus, Sweeney Todd and The Overcoat (originally for The Vancouver Playhouse) for CanStage; The Threepenny Opera for Vancouver Opera; Hotel Peccadillo and You Never Can Tell for the Shaw Festival.

Design for dance includes work for the Dance Theatre of Harlem, Les Ballets de Monte Carlo, The Stuttgart Ballet, Dancemakers and Ballet BC.

Costume design credits for television include Snow White, The Snow Queen, Legend of Earthsea (for which she received a Leo Award), Merlin's Apprentice, Final Days of Planet Earth, The Mermaid Chair and Journey to the Centre of the Earth, The Tortured and most recently Riverworld. Nancy has received 11 Jessie Richardson Awards for her costume designs for theatre.

Nancy Bryant's costumes present the principals in slender, early-Victorian restraint. But she goes to town with the chorus costumes, pointing up the jokes and zest for life of the text and music. Case in point, Mother Goose: seen from the front, she's straight from a nursery picture-book, from behind, a cut-away skirt reveals scarlet and black. A bit less blatantly, a glimpse of red cloak or shepherdess's crook amongst the tarts and roaring-boys of her establishment play on the folk elements in the music and text.
Elizabeth Paterson, Review Vancouver (The Rake's Progress)

Nancy Bryant ties it all together with what can only be described as the best set of costumes I've seen in years. The designer had asked Panych to shift the play's action from the 1920s to the '30s so she could take advantage of an explosion in new styles for women, and kudos to her for handing us an absolute orgy of perfectly matched, exquisitely crafted outfits.
Even the men's suits, so often neglected when a show focuses on female fashion, are picture perfect. From the top of its hat-bedecked head to the well-polished tip of its Perugia shoes, The Constant Wife is a constant charmer.
Peter Birnie, Vancouver Sun (The Constant Wife)

July, 2014